Tag Archives: nonprofit sector

A day may come when the courage of the nonprofit sector fails. Today is not that day!

[Image description: Three sleeping puppies inside a black shoe box. The puppies have their heads resting on one edge of the box. They are all white with brown markings. The puppy closest to the foreground has one front leg dangling over the side of the box.]

Colleagues of the nonprofit sector. My sisters and brothers. I see in your twitching eyes the dread of returning to work today. Scarcely a moon ago we looked forward to a time of relaxation. A few days where we could binge on some episodes of Black Mirror without guilt. An innocent, optimistic time where we resolved to clear out our fridge or otherwise take care of some household projects that we had been neglecting. A period of time that seemed so boundless, but that is now no more.

The dread you feel is pervasive, hanging over all of us, over me as well. It takes this heart of mine and squishes it in its calloused hand. Like you, I stand before the writhing tentacles of my to-do list, staring into the bottomless abyss of my email inbox, shuddering and cowering and clawing at my face in despair. Continue reading

12 pieces of advice for folks graduating and entering the nonprofit sector

unicorn spockHi everyone. First off, last week’s post—“When you don’t disclose salary range on a job posting, a unicorn loses its wings”—resonated with lots of people, and was shared nearly 7,000 times on social media. Let’s put an end to this horrible practice, because our professionals deserve fair, competitive compensation. And if that’s not available, they deserve at least transparency at the onset so that job applicants can start planning their budget and look out for sales on spaghetti and canned beans.

To that end, I am encouraging all EDs to disclose salary ranges on all new postings moving forward, and all job posting services to recommend, nay, require, disclosure. And all of us need to give feedback to our peers who ask for our help spreading the word on their new positions. If a colleague sends a posting to you and asks for help with outreach, check to make sure the salary range is disclosed. If it’s not, send back this message:

“[First name], you know that I have great respect for you as a colleague in our struggle to make the world better. There are few that I think are smarter, more dedicated, or good-looking-in-a-platonic-way, even in a field rife with intelligent, attractive people. However, I cannot in good conscience help you spread the word on your new position, because your posting does not disclose the salary range. Not disclosing the range widens the gender pay gap, disadvantages candidates of color, and wastes lots and lots of people’s time. I know not listing salary is a common practice, but it is one that is archaic and will be laughed at later. Like MySpace. Or skinny jeans. Or exercise. Disclose your salary range. Let us end this harmful practice and move our profession one step closer to equity.”

Second off, I just watched Game of Thrones and am upset and annoyed by what happened in the latest episode, so this post will likely be poorly edited.

All right, on to today’s topic. Lots of young professionals are graduating this month and starting to enter into our illustrious field. Congratulations, and welcome to a rewarding and lucrative career (or at least one of those two)! I received requests to provide advice for our potential new colleagues. You know you’re getting old when people start asking you for advice on stuff. Sigh. To be young and full of hopes and acne again.

Anyway, I asked the NWB Facebook community for suggestions, and have synthesized them into a few pieces of advice that I wished someone had told me when I first started out on the path to make the world better. Here they are, in no particular order, and definitely not comprehensive, and some are pretty obvious, and there are more than 12 (it’s not marketable to list more than 12 of anything in the title). Please add your own advice for our new colleagues in the comment section: Continue reading